Tiffany & Tot

Tips and Tricks related to cloth diapering and kids clothes, from an Atlantic Canadian perspective


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So many options! Underwear edition

There are four underwear patterns I have and love, all made by Stitch Upon A Time, and they ALL have options. Everything is available from XS-XXXL, and the brief cut and boxerwear are also available in kids sizing as small as 12 months.

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Brief cut, low rise, standard waistband and leg bands (with colour blocking).

If you want super simple straight forward ordering, that’s probably a brief cut, low rise, standard waistband and leg bands. But if you’re into looking for options? Oh my word, the options!

I’ll split the Scrundlewear, Thondlewear, Bunzies, and Boxerwear pattern options up according to the four questions I would ask if you’re looking for underwear:

  1. How much coverage would you like? (Minimal, medium, or a lot.)
  2. Low rise or high rise?
  3. Do you want a standard waistband, maternity waistband, or an extra wide waistband? (A maternity waistband cuts down below your belly, and an extra wide one can act as more coverage when you bend over, and it can help smooth out love handles.)
  4. Would you like bands for around the legs, or fold over elastic? (Many tend to find bands extra comfortable, but fold over elastic shifts around less – I prefer fold over elastic myself, and find them both comfortable.)

And again, if you want simple, a brief, low rise (or low rise plus), and leg bands is always a good fall back. 🙂

Coverage

In case you’re not sure what I mean, I’m talking about how much of your bum is covered. 🙂

For medium to lots of coverage…

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In the blue plaid is Full Coverage (low rise), Deadpool is the modified boyshort cut (low rise), and Mario is a brief cut (high rise).

The Brief cut is your best bet for medium coverage. It’s right around the middle, pretty standard.

There is the Boyshort cut for more coverage and a different feel (as the legs cut across parallel to the floor rather than curving up). Full Coverage has lots of coverage (it does have more coverage than the Boyshort in the back, while cutting up in the front like a brief), or Boxerwear for a boxer brief fit (available in a men’s or women’s fit).

I find the Boyshort cut isn’t quite as boyshorty as I like, and I’ve had some customers say the same thing, while others find the original fit perfect. I’ve adapted the pattern slightly for those looking for the little bit of extra length on the legs, so that they do stay parallel to the ground, and it’s this version featured in pictures. I’ve added 1-1.5″ down the outer edge of the legs depending on the person, and how much extra length they want.

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Mens no fly (low rise), mens with a fly (low rise), and womens (high rise), all shorter legs.

I will warn you, in my opinion, especially when they’re not being worn, Full Coverage is the granniest of granny panties. It’s also AMAZINGLY comfortable. Seriously, the most comfortable version I’ve tried, and they’re all super comfy.

Boxerwear fits like a slim short or boxer briefs, it has a shorter or longer leg option (a difference of about 2″).

They’re super comfy, and in the mens cut can be sewn with or without a fly, whatever floats your boat.

Decorative touches can also be added to boxerwear, for example, the blue plaid pair has ruching in the back, shown below (near the end).

Less coverage

The cuts from left to right are Booty, Super Booty and Thondlewear.

And for minimal coverage…

There is, in order of most coverage to least coverage (using pattern names), Booty, Super Booty, and Thondlewear.

Booty hits between Super Booty and Brief, Super Booty has an identical front and back, and the Thondlewear pattern is a thong.

And as with all patterns, all options are fair game, from rise to waistband to legs to decorative touches.

To be perfectly honest, I was really surprised by how comfortable these options were (and that does include the thondlewear). Even though I’m absolutely in love with the boyshorts cut, I would still happily make more minimal coverage for myself.

I was most shocked by the thondlewear. I haven’t worn a thong in months, and it was STILL really comfortable, and barely felt like I was wearing anything at all! (Really actually. Which is NOT what I was expecting given that it’s a thong.)

So if you’re on the fence, you might be surprised by how much you actually like them.

Rise and Waistband

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From left to right, there is High Rise, Low Rise Plus, Low Rise, and on the bottom is the Maternity Rise.

Here we have low rise, low rise plus, or high. Personally, I don’t find the low rise to be super low, but I do find the high rise to be quite high.

The standard waistband is comfortable and works well with low or high rise, but I’m in love with the extra wide waistband, and I really think you’ll love it too! I call it low rise plus.

Low rise plus is an extra wide waistband that has a double layer of fabric around your upper hips and waist, which is extra comfortable, helps smooth everything out, and keeps you from wondering if you’re covered when you bend over.

Plus, because it’s combined with a low rise, if you do bend over or stretch and it can be seen above your pants, the band can just look like you have a camisole tucked in and won’t automatically look like underwear. (Unless maybe if you’re wearing ultra low rise pants.)

The maternity rise cuts down lower in the front into a v so it sits comfortably under your belly, and can be applied to any cut of underwear. It’s still comfortable even if you’re not pregnant, so they wouldn’t be useless after the baby is born. If you’ve had a c section however, it will likely hit at the same spot as your scar, or at least it does for me. So in the even of a section I’d personally stay away from maternity rise for a while, depending on what is most comfortable for you.

Leg Bands or Fold Over Elastic (FOE)

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Both pairs are modified Boyshorts (with extra length down the sides of the legs), Low Rise Plus, on the left the legs are done with FOE and on the right with bands. (The other difference is on the right there is ruching in the back which makes it sit a little different, explored below.)

For the underwear patterns, these can have bands or fold over elastic around the legs. I really like both, though I’ll choose either over the other depending on a couple factors.

I most reach for bands when I want ultra comfort (because I can’t feel the bands in place at all), or when I’m wearing something looser or thicker like jeans. Bands show a little more of an underwear line than fold over elastic, and then can shift slightly as you wear them.

For me, this in minimal, and only for underwear that is medium to lots of coverage – Booty, Super Booty and Thondlewear don’t shift at all with bands. I also have some customers who rave about the bands for any amount of coverage and who don’t experience any shifting at all, so everyone is different.

I go for fold over elastic when I’m wearing snugger pants and want to hide an underwear line, or when I’m wearing a pad (because bands can create some bulk if a pad has to go around the underwear as well as the bands). Also, if the fold over elastic will sit under your bum (boyshorts or full coverage), it can create some, erm, definition lets say, under your bum.

I’ve heard some say they find the bands more comfortable, however I find both options quite comfortable, and FOE may be my personal favourite (though I’ve been falling back in love with bands again since trying them more). That said, I’m not super sensitive to tags and seams in clothing, so if you are quite sensitive in that way, bands are probably your best bet.

Keep in mind though, everyone is different, and my own personal preferences may or may not match yours. 🙂

Decorative or functional “bits/perks”

Warning – this section might make some people uncomfortable. But we’re talking about underwear, panties, or skivvies, if you will, so keep that in mind, and follow your heart in reading or not, whatever floats your boat.

decorative-touches.jpgSo the tamest one is a bit of colour blocking on the front. Pretty simple, but it can snazz things up a bit. Similarly, a strip of fabric or lace could be added along that line to add a bit of something something. Or you could have a faux drawstring, but the drawstring would probably be visible under snug clothing, so it might be better saved for bathing suits or sleep shorts, etc. I’m also a big fan of a faux fly.

Another option is a strip of thin ruching elastic that goes up the back. This makes your cheeks look more, umm, defined? from each other (while not becoming floss). This is one way to jazz up underwear, especially the full coverage underwear, and feel awesome about yourself. Finally, it keeps everything extra snug, which holds pads extra close, particularly overnight. It’s also still just as comfortable as underwear without ruching (at least in my opinion).

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On the bottom is the dart shown on the boxerwear pattern, and above it’s applied to an underwear pattern.

The final one I’m going to mention is about gender and underwear, and fair warning, I’m going to say the “p” and “v” words. The underwear patterns were all designed for the proud owners of vaginas. Not having a penis myself, I can’t speak to how easily one would fit into underwear that didn’t have it in mind, so maybe it’s not something that needs to be accommodated. But I’ve spent some time looking at the two boxerwear patterns, and by looking at the little dart (I mean, generous and manly dart) on the men’s boxerwear pattern, I’ve figured out how to add it to the patterns designed for vaginas.

I’m also open to custom situations, so if you’re looking to suit a specific need, I’ve honestly probably seen it mentioned in one of the millions of sewing groups I’m in, even if it’s super personal or involving sexy times. At any rate, I’m happy to talk with you honestly about whether it’s something I think I can accommodate, and if I don’t think I can sew it well, I’ll tell you. 🙂

Any comments or questions? You can let me know in the comments below, or use the contact form, which also includes my Facebook and Instagram information.


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So many options! Bunny Bottoms edition

wp-image--374654270.As either shorts or pants, these are adorable AND grow with your kid! The sizing is 3-12 months, 12 months-3 years, and 3 years to 6 years, plus they’re designed by Apple Tree Sewing, a Canadian pattern company! (I’ll try to tame down the exclamation marks – I’m a total Apple Tree Sewing fangirl, and you can find her facebook group here.)

The Bunny Bottoms can be made with or without pockets (and there are 3 different pocket options btw), pants or shorts (and there are 3 different takes on the shorts), and a partridge in a pear tree (aka. an optional faux drawstring).

wp-image--257397578.Side note: This basically means it’s easy to justify owning a gazillion pairs, as if I needed a reason!

They all have lots of room for a cloth diaper, and my son always picks his Bunny Bottoms before he picks any other pants, so I’m pretty sure they’re extra comfy.

While my son wears them just about everyday, my favourite use for them is in the diaper bag – no more worrying about whether he’s outgrown what’s in there! To see how they compare to some other grow with me pants options, take a look at this post, and for help on how to fold the cuffs, check here.

Pockets

We have peek-a-boo pockets, the kangaroo pocket, slit pockets, or no pockets at all. They’re all fully functional, though they do have different strengths. Bottom line, I’d go with whichever you like the look of best.

Peek-a-boo Pockets

wp-image--272635283.These are super cute and can be a way to use up a very small amount of fabric (just in case there is hardly any of your favourite print left). The pocket fabric peeks out the sides a bit, so you do see it (or at least you would if my business card wasn’t in the way in this picture!).

This pocket style shows stitching where the pocket attaches to the pants, so if you don’t like seeing stitching, the slit pocket may be a better option for you.

I think this style is my personal favourite, but I like them all. They’re sewn in similar to how I’ve seen pockets sewn on yoga pants.

Kangaroo Pocket

wp-image--1756115713.This has a very similar look to the peek-a-boo pockets, the difference being it’s connected through the middle like a kangaroo pocket on a hoodie. If the same fabric is used for the pants and the pockets, the only visual difference would be the stitching. In the peek-a-boo pockets, there is stitching following where the pocket attaches to the pants up through almost the middle. With the kangaroo pocket, the stitching is across the bottom of the pocket.

The kangaroo pocket is a great way to show off two different fabrics, or to show contrasting fabrics as shown above. And if the item is for an older baby or toddler, they may have fun sneaking there hand in one side and out through the other – at least this is a game my son likes to play!

Slit Pockets

wp-image--733087453.These pockets are inset in a different way, with less stitching to the pants. They are slightly bulkier than the other two options (because there are two layers of fabric making up the pocket rather than just one), but there’s lots of room in the Bunny Bottoms anyway, so they don’t look bulky when they’re worn.

There is still a little peeking going on with the pocket fabric (if you use a contrasting fabric), but not quite as much as the other two. These are sewn in like most jeans front pockets are attached.

Shorts vs. Shorts vs. Shorts vs. Pants

The shorts have two different band options (they can be snugger or looser), and the legs can also be hemmed if you prefer that over bands. The pants have long cuffs on the legs that can be folded up or down to accommodate the kid’s height.

Shorts – Cuffed (Looser or Tighter)

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The cuffed shorts are super cute. The looser ones allow the shorts to hang a bit, but it depends on how chunky the legs are. The tighter cuffs would be more snug to the legs.

Shown to the side is the looser cuff, size 3 years to 6 years, on a 3T or 4T sized kid with legs that are pretty much average, maybe slightly skinny, and you can see that there’s some room between the cuffs and his legs. Also, the difference in length between the looser and tighter cuff is about an inch.

Shorts – Hemmed

SONY DSC Hemmed is pretty cute too, where the shorts fall straight down the legs. They also work out to be a little shorter than a pair with bands (because they don’t have the extra length of the cuffs). Shown here is size 3 years to 6 years, on my 3-4T sized kid.

Personally, I feel hemmed is better suited to stiffer fabrics than fabrics that have lots of drape (and would float around a bit more), but it depends on the look you’re going for. If you’re unsure or have any questions, please let me know – I’d love to talk with you about it.

Pants

wp-image--2106052176Ahhh, the pants (my favourite). Shown to the side is size 3-6 years on both my 3 or 4T sized little monster, and my friend’s 6 or 7 sized kid. On the left you can see the cuffs are almost all the way rolled up on my son, but they’re still long enough on the right for the 6 or 7 sized kid too.

Even though my son is at the lower end of sizing, the bottom cuffs are just snug enough that they will pretty much stay above his feet when my son refuses to let me roll up the cuffs *cough cough* I mean, when he likes to do things himself and insert his independence… so they don’t quickly slide over his heels. (It will slowly happen over time, but not quickly, and that’s with him at the lower end of the size.) And you can see from the picture that they’re still comfortable for kids at the larger end of sizing.

For help with how to roll up the cuffs, check here.

Faux Drawstring

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This is a little detail that looks great, and has won me over (even though I was a little hesitant at first for some reason I can’t remember anymore). Since trying a drawstring now I need a drawstring on everything, which is why there’s a drawstring in just about all my pictures! It’s a faux drawstring, so just for show, but I’ve found my son likes trying to to tie it up, so it might buy you a couple minutes to make a coffee too! 🙂


So what are your favourite options for the Bunny Bottoms? I think mine are the peek-a-boo pockets on pants, but my son seems to like the slit pockets on shorts the best. I’d love to hear about your favourites in the comments below, or you can tell me here!

 

All four Apple Tree Drool Bib Styles, sewn by Tiffany and Tot


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So many options! Drool bibs edition

Options can be overwhelming, both for you as a customer of items, and for me as a sewist trying to decide what to offer! The next few posts will continue to break down the different options within patterns or pattern types.

I’ve already looked at the pros and cons of different diaper styles and insert options, as well as some different grow with me pants patterns. Today we’re on to bibs!

The Apple Tree Drool Bib Set is my go-to for bibs. 4 options, good sizing range, love the pattern, and the designer is Canadian. Win win win all around! Here are my specific thoughts on the different options.

Full disclosure – I *might* have tried on all 4 bib types myself while my toddler model was sleeping. So when I talk about sizing in each I’ll mention the sizing according to the pattern, how they fit on my 3T sized model, and how they would *cough* hypothetically fit an adult. And there are 3 different snap settings on the bibs, so there is some wiggle room in there.

I sew all except the double bandana bib with a water resistant heavy fleece back, so it will take a LOT more drool (or whatever) before the baby’s clothes will actually get wet. Unfortunately, I wasn’t sewing when my son was going through his terrifyingly-acidic-teething-drool stage, so he constantly had an unhappy rash down his chin and onto his chest whenever he was teething no matter how often I changed his bibs. So I’ve made what I know would have helped him, just in case it helps you too. 🙂

Side Snap Bandana Bib

Side Snap Bandana Bib sewn by Tiffany and Tot

Side Snap Bandana Bib sewn by Tiffany & Tot

This one is awesome for babies/tots with long hair because the snaps are on the side. However, the sizing for this pattern is the smallest of all four, otherwise it would be my personal favourite.

Fit according to the pattern: Newborn – 2 years

Fit on a 3T sized model: A little snugger than I’m comfortable with personally, but still mostly fit. (My recommendation is to keep this one for newborns and babies rather than toddler as well, but it of course depends on the kid.)

Hypothetical *cough* fit on an adult: Didn’t fit.

Slouchy Bandana Bib

Slouchy Bandana Bib sewn by Tiffany and Tot

Slouchy Bandana Bib sewn by Tiffany & Tot

This one is a fairly popular style right now, and while the pattern has it as up to 2 years, I found it fit my 3T sized model comfortably. This pattern isn’t quite as slouchy as some other patterns I’ve tried, but it’s also much less bulky, and lays flat – this mean it can be packed easily, mails well, and you’re not forever trying to figure out how to get creases out of a slouchy item you can’t really iron.

Fit according to the pattern: Newborn – 2 years

Fit on a 3T sized model: Fit well.

Hypothetical *cough* fit on an adult: Snug, but fit.

Double Bandana Bib

Double Bandana Bib sewn by Tiffany and Tot

Double Bandana Bib sewn by Tiffany & Tot

This one isn’t backed with water resistant fleece, but there are 4 layers between the drool and the clothing, so it’s pretty generous for absorbency as far as bibs go. It’s also reversible, so if you can’t choose between two prints, this is the way to go! It also seemed the largest for sizing of all four.

Fit according to the pattern: 6 months – 3 years

Fit on a 3T sized model: Fit well.

Hypothetical *cough* fit on an adult: Snug, but fit, seemed the largest of the 4 styles.

Scarf Bib

Scarf Bib sewn by Tiffany and Tot

Scarf Bib sewn by Tiffany & Tot

I think this is my personal favourite, though I’m not entirely sure why I like it over the other styles. (Just personal preference I guess.) The sizing is somewhere in the middle, so it would fit early and was still a very comfortable fit for my 3T sized model. It also fits very nicely under coats without being bulky, so I used this style for an actual scarf under a winter coat for my son. The fleece back kept him nice and warm for playing out in the snow. (That said, the Slouchy Bandana Bib and Side Snapped Bandana Bib would likely work just as well, I just didn’t make any of that style for my son.)

Fit according to the pattern: Newborn – 2 years

Fit on a 3T sized model: Fit well.

Hypothetical *cough* fit on an adult: Snug, but fit.